Forearm sweating pattern in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: effect of upper limb dominance

D.B. Maltais, V.B. Unnithan, B. Wilk, O. Bar-Or

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

PURPOSE:
To assess the effect of upper limb dominance on the forearm sweating pattern in spastic cerebral palsy (CP).

METHODS:
Eight children and adolescents with spastic CP (9.3–18.3 years), 7 of whom were left-hand dominant, performed 3 × 10 min arm cranking exercise at 35 °C, 50% relative humidity. Exercise intensity varied among subjects from 0.36 to 0.85 W·kg−1 body mass. Right and left forearm skin temperatures (Tsk) were measured just prior to the first exercise bout and during the last minute of the final bout. At the end of exercise, the sweat drops on the midanterior aspect of both forearms were photographed. Sweat gland population density (PD), average sweat drop area (DA) and the percentage of skin covered by sweat (%A) were determined from subsequently developed 35 mm slides, using computerized digitization. Data were analyzed using a paired t-test (α = 0.05).

RESULTS:
There were no significant differences between forearms in the increase in Tsk (on average, 0.16 °C higher on the dominant forearm; P = 0.60; 95% CI = −0.53, 0.86 °C;). PD was greater on the non-dominant forearm (mean difference = 21.9 sweat drops·cm−2; P = 0.03; 95% CI = 3.28, 40.47 sweat drops·cm−2). DA was smaller on the non-dominant forearm (mean difference = 0.0079 mm−2; P = 0.01; 95% CI = 0.0028, 0.0130 mm−2. Arm dominance did not affect %A (on average, 0.44% greater coverage on the non-dominant arm; P = 0.35; 95% CI = −0.60, 1.48%).

CONCLUSION:
The forearm sweating pattern in spastic CP is affected by upper limb dominance, but this is not related to local Tsk. Since the %A of the skin covered by sweat was the same for both forearms, the smaller DA on the non-dominant forearm could be related to the greater PD on that side, which in itself may be due to the smaller size of the non-dominant upper limb.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)S47-S47
Number of pages1
JournalMedicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Volume34
Issue number5
Publication statusPublished - May 2002
Externally publishedYes

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Sweating
Cerebral Palsy
Forearm
Upper Extremity
Sweat
Population Density
Exercise
Arm
Sweat Glands
Skin
Skin Temperature
Humidity
Hand

Cite this

@article{979c235e26374361bbbb1b129ed5b768,
title = "Forearm sweating pattern in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy: effect of upper limb dominance",
abstract = "PURPOSE:To assess the effect of upper limb dominance on the forearm sweating pattern in spastic cerebral palsy (CP).METHODS:Eight children and adolescents with spastic CP (9.3–18.3 years), 7 of whom were left-hand dominant, performed 3 × 10 min arm cranking exercise at 35 °C, 50{\%} relative humidity. Exercise intensity varied among subjects from 0.36 to 0.85 W·kg−1 body mass. Right and left forearm skin temperatures (Tsk) were measured just prior to the first exercise bout and during the last minute of the final bout. At the end of exercise, the sweat drops on the midanterior aspect of both forearms were photographed. Sweat gland population density (PD), average sweat drop area (DA) and the percentage of skin covered by sweat ({\%}A) were determined from subsequently developed 35 mm slides, using computerized digitization. Data were analyzed using a paired t-test (α = 0.05).RESULTS:There were no significant differences between forearms in the increase in Tsk (on average, 0.16 °C higher on the dominant forearm; P = 0.60; 95{\%} CI = −0.53, 0.86 °C;). PD was greater on the non-dominant forearm (mean difference = 21.9 sweat drops·cm−2; P = 0.03; 95{\%} CI = 3.28, 40.47 sweat drops·cm−2). DA was smaller on the non-dominant forearm (mean difference = 0.0079 mm−2; P = 0.01; 95{\%} CI = 0.0028, 0.0130 mm−2. Arm dominance did not affect {\%}A (on average, 0.44{\%} greater coverage on the non-dominant arm; P = 0.35; 95{\%} CI = −0.60, 1.48{\%}).CONCLUSION:The forearm sweating pattern in spastic CP is affected by upper limb dominance, but this is not related to local Tsk. Since the {\%}A of the skin covered by sweat was the same for both forearms, the smaller DA on the non-dominant forearm could be related to the greater PD on that side, which in itself may be due to the smaller size of the non-dominant upper limb.",
author = "D.B. Maltais and V.B. Unnithan and B. Wilk and O. Bar-Or",
year = "2002",
month = "5",
language = "English",
volume = "34",
pages = "S47--S47",
journal = "Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise",
issn = "0195-9131",
publisher = "American College of Sports Medicine",
number = "5",

}

Forearm sweating pattern in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy : effect of upper limb dominance. / Maltais, D.B.; Unnithan, V.B.; Wilk, B.; Bar-Or, O.

In: Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, Vol. 34, No. 5, 05.2002, p. S47-S47.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

TY - JOUR

T1 - Forearm sweating pattern in children and adolescents with cerebral palsy

T2 - effect of upper limb dominance

AU - Maltais, D.B.

AU - Unnithan, V.B.

AU - Wilk, B.

AU - Bar-Or, O.

PY - 2002/5

Y1 - 2002/5

N2 - PURPOSE:To assess the effect of upper limb dominance on the forearm sweating pattern in spastic cerebral palsy (CP).METHODS:Eight children and adolescents with spastic CP (9.3–18.3 years), 7 of whom were left-hand dominant, performed 3 × 10 min arm cranking exercise at 35 °C, 50% relative humidity. Exercise intensity varied among subjects from 0.36 to 0.85 W·kg−1 body mass. Right and left forearm skin temperatures (Tsk) were measured just prior to the first exercise bout and during the last minute of the final bout. At the end of exercise, the sweat drops on the midanterior aspect of both forearms were photographed. Sweat gland population density (PD), average sweat drop area (DA) and the percentage of skin covered by sweat (%A) were determined from subsequently developed 35 mm slides, using computerized digitization. Data were analyzed using a paired t-test (α = 0.05).RESULTS:There were no significant differences between forearms in the increase in Tsk (on average, 0.16 °C higher on the dominant forearm; P = 0.60; 95% CI = −0.53, 0.86 °C;). PD was greater on the non-dominant forearm (mean difference = 21.9 sweat drops·cm−2; P = 0.03; 95% CI = 3.28, 40.47 sweat drops·cm−2). DA was smaller on the non-dominant forearm (mean difference = 0.0079 mm−2; P = 0.01; 95% CI = 0.0028, 0.0130 mm−2. Arm dominance did not affect %A (on average, 0.44% greater coverage on the non-dominant arm; P = 0.35; 95% CI = −0.60, 1.48%).CONCLUSION:The forearm sweating pattern in spastic CP is affected by upper limb dominance, but this is not related to local Tsk. Since the %A of the skin covered by sweat was the same for both forearms, the smaller DA on the non-dominant forearm could be related to the greater PD on that side, which in itself may be due to the smaller size of the non-dominant upper limb.

AB - PURPOSE:To assess the effect of upper limb dominance on the forearm sweating pattern in spastic cerebral palsy (CP).METHODS:Eight children and adolescents with spastic CP (9.3–18.3 years), 7 of whom were left-hand dominant, performed 3 × 10 min arm cranking exercise at 35 °C, 50% relative humidity. Exercise intensity varied among subjects from 0.36 to 0.85 W·kg−1 body mass. Right and left forearm skin temperatures (Tsk) were measured just prior to the first exercise bout and during the last minute of the final bout. At the end of exercise, the sweat drops on the midanterior aspect of both forearms were photographed. Sweat gland population density (PD), average sweat drop area (DA) and the percentage of skin covered by sweat (%A) were determined from subsequently developed 35 mm slides, using computerized digitization. Data were analyzed using a paired t-test (α = 0.05).RESULTS:There were no significant differences between forearms in the increase in Tsk (on average, 0.16 °C higher on the dominant forearm; P = 0.60; 95% CI = −0.53, 0.86 °C;). PD was greater on the non-dominant forearm (mean difference = 21.9 sweat drops·cm−2; P = 0.03; 95% CI = 3.28, 40.47 sweat drops·cm−2). DA was smaller on the non-dominant forearm (mean difference = 0.0079 mm−2; P = 0.01; 95% CI = 0.0028, 0.0130 mm−2. Arm dominance did not affect %A (on average, 0.44% greater coverage on the non-dominant arm; P = 0.35; 95% CI = −0.60, 1.48%).CONCLUSION:The forearm sweating pattern in spastic CP is affected by upper limb dominance, but this is not related to local Tsk. Since the %A of the skin covered by sweat was the same for both forearms, the smaller DA on the non-dominant forearm could be related to the greater PD on that side, which in itself may be due to the smaller size of the non-dominant upper limb.

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 34

SP - S47-S47

JO - Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

JF - Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise

SN - 0195-9131

IS - 5

ER -