Feelings about work: A review of the socio-emotional impact of supported employment on people with intellectual disabilities

Andrew Jahoda, Jeremy Kemp, Sheila Riddell, Pauline Banks

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background Work is an aspiration for many people with intellectual disability and is regarded as a vital goal by policy-makers in pursuit of social inclusion. The aim of this study was to consider the impact of supported employment on the socio-emotional well-being of people with intellectual disabilities.

Method A systematic search was conducted. The review included case-controlled and longitudinal studies measuring outcomes for: (1) quality of life (QOL), (2) social life and (3) autonomy.

Results While results for QOL, well-being and autonomy were largely positive, there was a lack of perceived social acceptance. The findings are interpreted in the light of methodological strengths and weaknesses.

Conclusions Implications for the socio-emotional support required by some individuals in employment, and directions for future research are discussed.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1-18
JournalJournal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jan 2008

Keywords

  • emotional
  • intellectual disability
  • outcomes
  • review
  • social
  • supported employment

Cite this

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Feelings about work: A review of the socio-emotional impact of supported employment on people with intellectual disabilities. / Jahoda, Andrew; Kemp, Jeremy; Riddell, Sheila; Banks, Pauline.

In: Journal of Applied Research in Intellectual Disabilities, Vol. 21, No. 1, 01.2008, p. 1-18.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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