Factors Affecting Take-up of and Drop-out from Home Composting Schemes

P Tucker, D Speirs, S I Fletcher, Edward Edgerton, James McKechnie

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

This paper reports survey results from Scotland and north-west England into home composting attitudes and behaviours. The results concentrate on: the take-up of home composting through promotional campaigns; and the reasons for drop-out. Motivations for take-up were balanced between environmental and gardening reasons, although capital cost was an important issue for some. Drop-outs occurred mainly through participants moving house or because of lack of success in producing compost. Few of those experiencing problems sought help. Those that did favoured official or professional sources. Neighbourhood social pressures to compost were relatively weak. The results are discussed in terms of the sustainability of home composting behaviour and the manage ment interventions that might be required in sustaining that behaviour.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)245-249
JournalLocal Environment
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Jun 2003

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title = "Factors Affecting Take-up of and Drop-out from Home Composting Schemes",
abstract = "This paper reports survey results from Scotland and north-west England into home composting attitudes and behaviours. The results concentrate on: the take-up of home composting through promotional campaigns; and the reasons for drop-out. Motivations for take-up were balanced between environmental and gardening reasons, although capital cost was an important issue for some. Drop-outs occurred mainly through participants moving house or because of lack of success in producing compost. Few of those experiencing problems sought help. Those that did favoured official or professional sources. Neighbourhood social pressures to compost were relatively weak. The results are discussed in terms of the sustainability of home composting behaviour and the manage ment interventions that might be required in sustaining that behaviour.",
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Factors Affecting Take-up of and Drop-out from Home Composting Schemes. / Tucker, P; Speirs, D; Fletcher, S I ; Edgerton, Edward; McKechnie, James.

In: Local Environment, 06.2003, p. 245-249.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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