Exploring how the development of a nurse-led vascular access service has benefited patients

Linda J Kelly, Esther Buchan, Ann Brown, Yvonne Tehrani, Debbie Cowan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

The management and care of patients in Greater Glasgow and Clyde needing long-term vascular access has changed markedly over the past six years. A nurse-led vascular access service has been introduced to reduce waiting times for patients requiring long-term venous access for treatments such as chemotherapy, long-term antibiotics, renal dialysis and feeding. Nurses in the service now insert tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVCs) and also educate and train other healthcare professionals. This service has led to a reduction in complications and provided a source of expert advice for both patients and healthcare professionals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)16-8
Number of pages3
JournalNursing Times
Volume105
Issue number24
Publication statusPublished - 16 Jul 2009

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Blood Vessels
Nurses
Patient Care Management
Delivery of Health Care
Central Venous Catheters
Renal Dialysis
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Drug Therapy
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Catheters, Indwelling
  • Education, Nursing, Continuing
  • Humans
  • Nurse-Patient Relations

Cite this

Kelly, L. J., Buchan, E., Brown, A., Tehrani, Y., & Cowan, D. (2009). Exploring how the development of a nurse-led vascular access service has benefited patients. Nursing Times, 105(24), 16-8.
Kelly, Linda J ; Buchan, Esther ; Brown, Ann ; Tehrani, Yvonne ; Cowan, Debbie. / Exploring how the development of a nurse-led vascular access service has benefited patients. In: Nursing Times. 2009 ; Vol. 105, No. 24. pp. 16-8.
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Kelly, LJ, Buchan, E, Brown, A, Tehrani, Y & Cowan, D 2009, 'Exploring how the development of a nurse-led vascular access service has benefited patients' Nursing Times, vol. 105, no. 24, pp. 16-8.

Exploring how the development of a nurse-led vascular access service has benefited patients. / Kelly, Linda J; Buchan, Esther; Brown, Ann; Tehrani, Yvonne; Cowan, Debbie.

In: Nursing Times, Vol. 105, No. 24, 16.07.2009, p. 16-8.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Buchan, Esther

AU - Brown, Ann

AU - Tehrani, Yvonne

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KW - Humans

KW - Nurse-Patient Relations

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Kelly LJ, Buchan E, Brown A, Tehrani Y, Cowan D. Exploring how the development of a nurse-led vascular access service has benefited patients. Nursing Times. 2009 Jul 16;105(24):16-8.