Abstract

In this article we draw upon three case studies of American cities bidding to host the Summer Olympic Games to explore the role media, particularly new media, plays in the formation of anti-bid protest movements. Using data gathered from in-depth interviews with leaders of several activist campaigns and a content analysis of related websites and social media accounts, the paper demonstrates the increasing role new media plays in enabling resistant movements to form and articulate messages oppositional to boosterist coverage of mega sport event bids. However, it also highlights the limits of such new media activism in terms of both reach and capacity to effect change in isolation. Rather, the paper demonstrates that new media activitsm is at its most potent when it links and interacts with other actors, including legacy media outlets. The paper therefore concludes by highlighting the need for connectivity to both legacy media and physical acts of resistance and protest in order to generate meaningful impact and generate change.
Original languageEnglish
JournalLeisure Studies
Early online date6 Dec 2019
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 6 Dec 2019

Fingerprint

new media
media role
event
Olympic Games
sport
connectivity
protest movement
summer
social media
protest
website
social isolation
content analysis
Sports
campaign
coverage
leader
Activism
Bidding
New media

Keywords

  • Event bidding
  • New media activism
  • Boston 2024
  • Olympics
  • Protest

Cite this

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title = "Event bidding and new media activism",
abstract = "In this article we draw upon three case studies of American cities bidding to host the Summer Olympic Games to explore the role media, particularly new media, plays in the formation of anti-bid protest movements. Using data gathered from in-depth interviews with leaders of several activist campaigns and a content analysis of related websites and social media accounts, the paper demonstrates the increasing role new media plays in enabling resistant movements to form and articulate messages oppositional to boosterist coverage of mega sport event bids. However, it also highlights the limits of such new media activism in terms of both reach and capacity to effect change in isolation. Rather, the paper demonstrates that new media activitsm is at its most potent when it links and interacts with other actors, including legacy media outlets. The paper therefore concludes by highlighting the need for connectivity to both legacy media and physical acts of resistance and protest in order to generate meaningful impact and generate change.",
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author = "Daniel Turner and David McGillivray and John Lauermann",
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Event bidding and new media activism. / Turner, Daniel; McGillivray, David; Lauermann, John.

In: Leisure Studies, 06.12.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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