Does Supporting Equated Learning for Online and On-campus Postgraduate Students by Using a VLE Increase Tutor Workload?

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Abstract

This study assesses the effects of study mode on student achievement, student satisfaction and staff workload in three modes of study: online learning, on-campus learning and a blended mix of both online and on-campus tutorials. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in grades (summative marks) between online and on-campus groups. However, online students required more tutor assistance than on-campus students. Online provision increased tutor time, dependent on group size and study mode. Similar to other research these findings indicate that students are not disadvantaged by the isolation of online learning, and/or that tutors’ workload increases to create parity in summative grade scores. This ongoing evaluation suggests that traditional on-campus views of calculating tutor workload may require rethinking to acknowledge online tutor activity.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)97-110
JournalResearch Review: A Special Topics Journal from the University of the Fraser Valley
Volume2
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - 2009

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tutor
workload
learning
student
group size
statistical analysis
social isolation
assistance
staff
evaluation
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title = "Does Supporting Equated Learning for Online and On-campus Postgraduate Students by Using a VLE Increase Tutor Workload?",
abstract = "This study assesses the effects of study mode on student achievement, student satisfaction and staff workload in three modes of study: online learning, on-campus learning and a blended mix of both online and on-campus tutorials. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in grades (summative marks) between online and on-campus groups. However, online students required more tutor assistance than on-campus students. Online provision increased tutor time, dependent on group size and study mode. Similar to other research these findings indicate that students are not disadvantaged by the isolation of online learning, and/or that tutors’ workload increases to create parity in summative grade scores. This ongoing evaluation suggests that traditional on-campus views of calculating tutor workload may require rethinking to acknowledge online tutor activity.",
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AB - This study assesses the effects of study mode on student achievement, student satisfaction and staff workload in three modes of study: online learning, on-campus learning and a blended mix of both online and on-campus tutorials. Statistical analysis revealed no significant differences in grades (summative marks) between online and on-campus groups. However, online students required more tutor assistance than on-campus students. Online provision increased tutor time, dependent on group size and study mode. Similar to other research these findings indicate that students are not disadvantaged by the isolation of online learning, and/or that tutors’ workload increases to create parity in summative grade scores. This ongoing evaluation suggests that traditional on-campus views of calculating tutor workload may require rethinking to acknowledge online tutor activity.

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