Does recent research evidence support the hyperpersonal model of online impression management?

Graham G. Scott*, Chris Fullwood

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)
5 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The hyperpersonal model of communication was conceived in the 1990s and has driven much of the research into online impression management. Based on four principal tenets (increased control, asynchronicity of communication, increased physical distance and reallocation of cognitive resources) it has largely received empirical support, especially by research involving text-only communication. This review briefly summarises this research before identifying four areas in which it is not supported by findings: the wider context of online communication, the expanding nature of online platforms to include pictures and video, use of language in online environments, online self-disclosure. We suggest that the model is modified and updated, or its limitations defined, with respect to this evidence.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)106-111
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent Opinion in Psychology
Volume36
Early online date30 May 2020
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Dec 2020

Keywords

  • communication
  • online impression management
  • text-only communication

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