Decrease in health-related quality of life associated with awareness of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in Scotland

Scott A. McDonald, Sharon J. Hutchinson, Norah E. Palmateer, Elizabeth Allen, Sheila O. Cameron, David J. Goldberg, Avril Taylor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background & Aims: Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection can significantly reduce health-related quality of life (QoL), but it is not clear if reduction is associated with the infection or with being aware of one's infection status. Understanding the impact of a HCV diagnosis on QoL is essential to inform decision-making regarding screening/testing and treatment. Methods: Using a cross-sectional design, we assessed QoL in 2898 people who inject drugs (PWID), surveyed in Scotland during 2010 using EQ-5D. Multifactorial regression compared self-reported QoL between PWID who were (i) chronically HCV-infected and aware of their infected status, (ii) chronically HCV-infected but unaware, and (iii) not chronically infected. Results: Median time since onset of injecting was 10 years; not chronically infected PWID were younger and had shorter injecting careers than chronically infected PWID. Median EQ-5D was highest for the not chronically infected and the chronic/unaware groups (0.73) compared with the chronic/aware group (0.66). After adjustment for demographic and behavioural co-factors, QoL was significantly reduced in chronic/aware compared with chronic/unaware PWID (adjusted B = -0.09, p = 0.005); there was no evidence for a difference in QoL between not chronically infected and chronic/unaware PWID (adjusted B = -0.03, p = 0.13). Conclusions: Awareness of one's chronic HCV status was associated with reduced health-related QoL, but there was no evidence for further reduction attributable to chronic infection itself after adjusting for important covariate differences. (C) 2012 European Association for the Study of the Liver. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)460-466
JournalJournal of Hepatology
Volume58
Issue number3
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2013

Keywords

  • Quality of life
  • HCV
  • EQ-5D
  • People who inject drugs

Cite this

McDonald, S. A., Hutchinson, S. J., Palmateer, N. E., Allen, E., Cameron, S. O., Goldberg, D. J., & Taylor, A. (2013). Decrease in health-related quality of life associated with awareness of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in Scotland. Journal of Hepatology, 58(3), 460-466.
McDonald, Scott A. ; Hutchinson, Sharon J. ; Palmateer, Norah E. ; Allen, Elizabeth ; Cameron, Sheila O. ; Goldberg, David J. ; Taylor, Avril. / Decrease in health-related quality of life associated with awareness of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in Scotland. In: Journal of Hepatology. 2013 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 460-466.
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McDonald, SA, Hutchinson, SJ, Palmateer, NE, Allen, E, Cameron, SO, Goldberg, DJ & Taylor, A 2013, 'Decrease in health-related quality of life associated with awareness of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in Scotland' Journal of Hepatology, vol. 58, no. 3, pp. 460-466.

Decrease in health-related quality of life associated with awareness of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in Scotland. / McDonald, Scott A.; Hutchinson, Sharon J.; Palmateer, Norah E.; Allen, Elizabeth; Cameron, Sheila O.; Goldberg, David J.; Taylor, Avril.

In: Journal of Hepatology, Vol. 58, No. 3, 03.2013, p. 460-466.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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McDonald SA, Hutchinson SJ, Palmateer NE, Allen E, Cameron SO, Goldberg DJ et al. Decrease in health-related quality of life associated with awareness of hepatitis C virus infection among people who inject drugs in Scotland. Journal of Hepatology. 2013 Mar;58(3):460-466.