Decent Work and The Employers’ Perspective: Evidence From Scotland

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Abstract

Between the established and high profile concerns with the quality of employment through ‘fair work’ for the low paid and talent management of the key staff in organizations lies a ‘murky middle’; the quality of employment for many in a changing world of work and employment. To better understand this neglected part of the workforce the concept of ‘decent work’ has been proposed as a focus for research and action.

We report on the background literature on decent work from the employers’ perspective, and a study to explore what decent work means in Scotland, if it is provided, and how it may be advanced. This is part of a project that included research with the future workforce, young people and low paid workers, as well as employers. The employers’ perspective comes from semi-structured interviews with employers representing organizations and sectors in Scotland. There is no single definition of decent work among employers, though there is shared view of the fundamentals on what decent work means. The challenges of analysing the extent to which decent work is provided, and where it is not how to advance it, are outlined from the employers’ perspective. This study provides the foundation for a larger research project we are presently planning and undertaking. This highlights that decent work is an issue which should be high on the political agenda, given its potential to further not only well-being but also increase productivity, generate higher fiscal revenues, and promote gender equality at work.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2016
EventInternational Social Innovation Research Conference 2016 - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 5 Sep 20167 Sep 2016
http://www.isircconference2016.com/

Conference

ConferenceInternational Social Innovation Research Conference 2016
Abbreviated titleISIRC 2016
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period5/09/167/09/16
OtherISIRC is the world’s leading interdisciplinary social innovation research conference. The conference brings together scholars from across the globe to discuss social innovation from a variety of perspectives. ISIRC 2016 will be hosted by The Yunus Centre for Social Business and Health , Glasgow Caledonian University from Monday 5th to Wednesday 7th September 2016. The conference will take place in the heart of Glasgow City Centre, 200 SVS.
Internet address

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Employers
Scotland
Workforce
Staff
Well-being
Revenue
Talent management
Workers
Productivity
Gender equality
Agenda
Structured interview
Planning
Fiscal

Cite this

Gibb, S., & Ishaq, M. (2016). Decent Work and The Employers’ Perspective: Evidence From Scotland. Paper presented at International Social Innovation Research Conference 2016, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
Gibb, Stephen ; Ishaq, Mohammed. / Decent Work and The Employers’ Perspective : Evidence From Scotland. Paper presented at International Social Innovation Research Conference 2016, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
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Gibb, S & Ishaq, M 2016, 'Decent Work and The Employers’ Perspective: Evidence From Scotland' Paper presented at International Social Innovation Research Conference 2016, Glasgow, United Kingdom, 5/09/16 - 7/09/16, .

Decent Work and The Employers’ Perspective : Evidence From Scotland. / Gibb, Stephen; Ishaq, Mohammed.

2016. Paper presented at International Social Innovation Research Conference 2016, Glasgow, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

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T1 - Decent Work and The Employers’ Perspective

T2 - Evidence From Scotland

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AU - Ishaq, Mohammed

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Gibb S, Ishaq M. Decent Work and The Employers’ Perspective: Evidence From Scotland. 2016. Paper presented at International Social Innovation Research Conference 2016, Glasgow, United Kingdom.