CO2 laser irradiation of a magnesia partially stabilized zirconia (MgO-PSZ) bioceramic and the subsequent improvements in human osteoblast cell adhesion

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

Osteoblast cells were used in an in vitro test to examine changes in cell adhesion on a magnesia partially stabilised zirconia (MgO-PSZ) bioceramic after CO2 laser treatment. The surface roughness, microstructure, crystal size and surface energy of untreated and CO2 laser treated samples were fully characterized. After 24 h cell incubation, no cells were observed on the untreated MgO-PSZ, whereas cells were seen to have attached onto the CO2 laser treated MgO-PSZ and exhibited spreading and good attachment. Moreover, the cell coverage density implied an increase in cell proliferation with increasing CO2 laser power density. Enhancement of the surface energy of the MgO-PSZ, especially its polar component, caused by the CO2 laser treatment was found to play a significant role in the initial cell attachment process, thereby leading to enhanced cell growth. Also, the change in topography induced by the CO2 laser treatment was identified as one of the factors influencing the osteoblast cell response.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationICALEO® 2006
Subtitle of host publication25th International Congress on Laser Materials Processing and Laser Microfabrication
PublisherAIP Publishing
ISBN (Electronic)9780912035857
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Oct 2006
Externally publishedYes
Event25th International Congress on Laser Materials Processing and Laser Microfabrication - Scottsdale, United States
Duration: 30 Oct 20062 Nov 2006

Conference

Conference25th International Congress on Laser Materials Processing and Laser Microfabrication
Abbreviated titleICALEO® 2006
Country/TerritoryUnited States
CityScottsdale
Period30/10/062/11/06

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