Comparison of the influence of sediment and diet as sources of metals for diatoms and meiofauna.

J. Figures, Andrew Hursthouse, Joy Matthews

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Levels of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn were determined by ICP-AES and GFAAS in epipelic diatoms meiofauna and oxic sediment sampled from Woodhall, a site within the Inner Clyde Estuary, Scotland.
The availability of a number of metals to epipelic diatoms and meiofauna was investigated by comparison with the total (aqua regia extractes) and bioavailable (acetic acid extracted) metal concentrations and the proportion of bioavailable metal for evidence and metal accumulation. Both total and bioavailable metal sediment concentrations strongly correlated with chromium nickel and zinc tissue levels.
Accumulation of chromium and zinc by meiofauna from dietary sources was suggested by comparison with levels in the epipelic diatom fraction.
The results highlight the problem in assessing metal concentrations in environmental samples but indicate that metal levels in food may be more important that availability of metals in sediments for the accumulation of some metals.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)66-79
Number of pages14
JournalCoastal Zone Topics Process Ecology & Management
Volume3
Publication statusPublished - 1997
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

meiofauna
diatom
diet
metal
sediment
chromium
zinc
oxic sediment
comparison
acetic acid
nickel
estuary
food

Keywords

  • zoology
  • marine biology
  • diet
  • habitat
  • chemical pollution

Cite this

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title = "Comparison of the influence of sediment and diet as sources of metals for diatoms and meiofauna.",
abstract = "Levels of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn were determined by ICP-AES and GFAAS in epipelic diatoms meiofauna and oxic sediment sampled from Woodhall, a site within the Inner Clyde Estuary, Scotland.The availability of a number of metals to epipelic diatoms and meiofauna was investigated by comparison with the total (aqua regia extractes) and bioavailable (acetic acid extracted) metal concentrations and the proportion of bioavailable metal for evidence and metal accumulation. Both total and bioavailable metal sediment concentrations strongly correlated with chromium nickel and zinc tissue levels.Accumulation of chromium and zinc by meiofauna from dietary sources was suggested by comparison with levels in the epipelic diatom fraction.The results highlight the problem in assessing metal concentrations in environmental samples but indicate that metal levels in food may be more important that availability of metals in sediments for the accumulation of some metals.",
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Comparison of the influence of sediment and diet as sources of metals for diatoms and meiofauna. / Figures, J.; Hursthouse, Andrew; Matthews, Joy.

In: Coastal Zone Topics Process Ecology & Management, Vol. 3, 1997, p. 66-79.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Comparison of the influence of sediment and diet as sources of metals for diatoms and meiofauna.

AU - Figures, J.

AU - Hursthouse, Andrew

AU - Matthews, Joy

PY - 1997

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AB - Levels of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni and Zn were determined by ICP-AES and GFAAS in epipelic diatoms meiofauna and oxic sediment sampled from Woodhall, a site within the Inner Clyde Estuary, Scotland.The availability of a number of metals to epipelic diatoms and meiofauna was investigated by comparison with the total (aqua regia extractes) and bioavailable (acetic acid extracted) metal concentrations and the proportion of bioavailable metal for evidence and metal accumulation. Both total and bioavailable metal sediment concentrations strongly correlated with chromium nickel and zinc tissue levels.Accumulation of chromium and zinc by meiofauna from dietary sources was suggested by comparison with levels in the epipelic diatom fraction.The results highlight the problem in assessing metal concentrations in environmental samples but indicate that metal levels in food may be more important that availability of metals in sediments for the accumulation of some metals.

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