Comparing the effects of vertical elevation and horizontal position on line bisection biases in peripersonal and extrapersonal space

B. Hatin, L. Sykes Tottenham, C. Oriet

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

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Abstract

The line bisection task is a simple measure of visuospatial bias, with the majority of adults bisecting lines to the left of true centre. This leftward bias is referred to as pseudoneglect, and is thought to arise from right hemisphere dominance for spatial processing. In the present study, we examined how line bisection performance was affected by physical elevation (the task was completed at eye level, above the head, and near the knees) and horizontal position (the lines were presented centrally, offset to the left, and offset to the right). We also
compared performance on the pen-and-paper task to performance on a laser line bisection task, to see whether these spatial manipulations affect performance in similar ways in peripersonal and extrapersonal space. Results showed a leftward bias for the peripersonal pen-and-paper task, and a rightward bias for the extrapersonal laser line bisection task. Physical elevation and horizontal position influenced the direction and extent of the biases on these two line bisection tasks, and performance on these tasks was correlated when lines were up and to the left, and down and to the right. These findings are discussed in the context of other known influences on visuospatial attention.
Original languageEnglish
Pages46-46
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jun 2017
Externally publishedYes
Event27th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Sciences - University of Regina, Regina, Canada
Duration: 2 Jun 20174 Jun 2017
https://www.csbbcs.org/meetings/previous-meetings/

Conference

Conference27th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Sciences
Abbreviated titleCSBBCS 2017
CountryCanada
CityRegina
Period2/06/174/06/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

Task Performance and Analysis
Lasers
Knee
Head
Spatial Processing
Direction compound

Cite this

Hatin, B., Sykes Tottenham, L., & Oriet, C. (2017). Comparing the effects of vertical elevation and horizontal position on line bisection biases in peripersonal and extrapersonal space. 46-46. Poster session presented at 27th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Sciences, Regina, Canada.
Hatin, B. ; Sykes Tottenham, L. ; Oriet, C. / Comparing the effects of vertical elevation and horizontal position on line bisection biases in peripersonal and extrapersonal space. Poster session presented at 27th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Sciences, Regina, Canada.1 p.
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Hatin, B, Sykes Tottenham, L & Oriet, C 2017, 'Comparing the effects of vertical elevation and horizontal position on line bisection biases in peripersonal and extrapersonal space' 27th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Sciences, Regina, Canada, 2/06/17 - 4/06/17, pp. 46-46.

Comparing the effects of vertical elevation and horizontal position on line bisection biases in peripersonal and extrapersonal space. / Hatin, B.; Sykes Tottenham, L.; Oriet, C.

2017. 46-46 Poster session presented at 27th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Sciences, Regina, Canada.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

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T1 - Comparing the effects of vertical elevation and horizontal position on line bisection biases in peripersonal and extrapersonal space

AU - Hatin, B.

AU - Sykes Tottenham, L.

AU - Oriet, C.

PY - 2017/6/2

Y1 - 2017/6/2

N2 - The line bisection task is a simple measure of visuospatial bias, with the majority of adults bisecting lines to the left of true centre. This leftward bias is referred to as pseudoneglect, and is thought to arise from right hemisphere dominance for spatial processing. In the present study, we examined how line bisection performance was affected by physical elevation (the task was completed at eye level, above the head, and near the knees) and horizontal position (the lines were presented centrally, offset to the left, and offset to the right). We alsocompared performance on the pen-and-paper task to performance on a laser line bisection task, to see whether these spatial manipulations affect performance in similar ways in peripersonal and extrapersonal space. Results showed a leftward bias for the peripersonal pen-and-paper task, and a rightward bias for the extrapersonal laser line bisection task. Physical elevation and horizontal position influenced the direction and extent of the biases on these two line bisection tasks, and performance on these tasks was correlated when lines were up and to the left, and down and to the right. These findings are discussed in the context of other known influences on visuospatial attention.

AB - The line bisection task is a simple measure of visuospatial bias, with the majority of adults bisecting lines to the left of true centre. This leftward bias is referred to as pseudoneglect, and is thought to arise from right hemisphere dominance for spatial processing. In the present study, we examined how line bisection performance was affected by physical elevation (the task was completed at eye level, above the head, and near the knees) and horizontal position (the lines were presented centrally, offset to the left, and offset to the right). We alsocompared performance on the pen-and-paper task to performance on a laser line bisection task, to see whether these spatial manipulations affect performance in similar ways in peripersonal and extrapersonal space. Results showed a leftward bias for the peripersonal pen-and-paper task, and a rightward bias for the extrapersonal laser line bisection task. Physical elevation and horizontal position influenced the direction and extent of the biases on these two line bisection tasks, and performance on these tasks was correlated when lines were up and to the left, and down and to the right. These findings are discussed in the context of other known influences on visuospatial attention.

M3 - Poster

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Hatin B, Sykes Tottenham L, Oriet C. Comparing the effects of vertical elevation and horizontal position on line bisection biases in peripersonal and extrapersonal space. 2017. Poster session presented at 27th Annual Meeting of the Canadian Society for Brain, Behaviour, and Cognitive Sciences, Regina, Canada.