Challenging the Status Quo: Reclaiming Indigenous Knowledge through Namibia’s Postcolonial Education System

Yonah H. Matemba, John Makala Lilemba

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

15 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Although Namibia has been independent for more than two decades (1990–2014), the school curriculum remains essentially Eurocentric despite rhetoric on educational reform. Similar to other African countries, Western ideological power continues to dominate postcolonial education, even though political power rests in the hands of African leaders. Employing George Sefa Dei’s anticolonial discursive framework, this article presents a critical analysis of postcolonial education in Namibia and of its failure to adopt a diverse and culturally sensitive school curriculum. This article concludes that, in future reforms, the Namibian education system must incorporate indigenous knowledge not only to preserve this knowledge but also to recognize the multilogicality of knowledge production and its uses in diverse cultural contexts.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)159-174
Number of pages16
JournalDiaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: Studies of Migration, Integration, Equity, and Cultural Survival
Volume9
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Fingerprint

Namibia
education system
Western powers
curriculum
knowledge production
educational reform
political power
school
knowledge
education
rhetoric
leader
reform

Cite this

@article{ca2445149540404eb669231167360b80,
title = "Challenging the Status Quo: Reclaiming Indigenous Knowledge through Namibia’s Postcolonial Education System",
abstract = "Although Namibia has been independent for more than two decades (1990–2014), the school curriculum remains essentially Eurocentric despite rhetoric on educational reform. Similar to other African countries, Western ideological power continues to dominate postcolonial education, even though political power rests in the hands of African leaders. Employing George Sefa Dei’s anticolonial discursive framework, this article presents a critical analysis of postcolonial education in Namibia and of its failure to adopt a diverse and culturally sensitive school curriculum. This article concludes that, in future reforms, the Namibian education system must incorporate indigenous knowledge not only to preserve this knowledge but also to recognize the multilogicality of knowledge production and its uses in diverse cultural contexts.",
author = "Matemba, {Yonah H.} and Lilemba, {John Makala}",
year = "2015",
doi = "10.1080/15595692.2014.997382",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
pages = "159--174",
journal = "Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: Studies of Migration, Integration, Equity, and Cultural Survival",
issn = "1559-5692",
publisher = "Taylor & Francis",
number = "3",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Challenging the Status Quo

T2 - Reclaiming Indigenous Knowledge through Namibia’s Postcolonial Education System

AU - Matemba, Yonah H.

AU - Lilemba, John Makala

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Although Namibia has been independent for more than two decades (1990–2014), the school curriculum remains essentially Eurocentric despite rhetoric on educational reform. Similar to other African countries, Western ideological power continues to dominate postcolonial education, even though political power rests in the hands of African leaders. Employing George Sefa Dei’s anticolonial discursive framework, this article presents a critical analysis of postcolonial education in Namibia and of its failure to adopt a diverse and culturally sensitive school curriculum. This article concludes that, in future reforms, the Namibian education system must incorporate indigenous knowledge not only to preserve this knowledge but also to recognize the multilogicality of knowledge production and its uses in diverse cultural contexts.

AB - Although Namibia has been independent for more than two decades (1990–2014), the school curriculum remains essentially Eurocentric despite rhetoric on educational reform. Similar to other African countries, Western ideological power continues to dominate postcolonial education, even though political power rests in the hands of African leaders. Employing George Sefa Dei’s anticolonial discursive framework, this article presents a critical analysis of postcolonial education in Namibia and of its failure to adopt a diverse and culturally sensitive school curriculum. This article concludes that, in future reforms, the Namibian education system must incorporate indigenous knowledge not only to preserve this knowledge but also to recognize the multilogicality of knowledge production and its uses in diverse cultural contexts.

U2 - 10.1080/15595692.2014.997382

DO - 10.1080/15595692.2014.997382

M3 - Article

VL - 9

SP - 159

EP - 174

JO - Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: Studies of Migration, Integration, Equity, and Cultural Survival

JF - Diaspora, Indigenous, and Minority Education: Studies of Migration, Integration, Equity, and Cultural Survival

SN - 1559-5692

IS - 3

ER -