Can legacy pollution influence antimicrobial resistance in estuarine sediments? the geochemical role!

Kiri Rodgers, Iain McLellan (Contributor), Tatyana Peshkur (Contributor), Roderick Williams (Contributor), Rebecca Tonner (Contributor), Andrew S. Hursthouse (Contributor), Charles W. Knapp (Contributor), Fiona L. Henriquez (Contributor)

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentation

Abstract

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is fast becoming a top concern worldwide with the potential for catastrophic repercussions. The majority of research to date focuses on the medical
causes, particularly the use and disposal of antibiotics, however there is growing evidence that in fact “stressful” environments caused by anthropogenic activities with subsequent
geochemical contaminates to be a notable attributor to AMR as well. This research highlights key geochemical parameters e.g. Metal and PAH contamination in sediments from the river
Clyde, which is a key historical hub of industrial activity and pollution, and the correlations they have with the abundance of antimicrobial resistance.

The ability to compare different pollution conditions among stratified layers in estuarine sediments allow us to determine key contributing factors affecting antibiotic resistance
(AMR) in microbial communities. This is a unique approach of investigating resistance traits will generate a wealth of information about how our past industrial actions may impact public and environmental health now and/or the near future. Ultimately not only does such a connection highlight that the AMR widespread problem is greater than we thought, but offers
a potential of treatment or a way of controlling its prevalence in a sustainable way.
Original languageEnglish
Pages96-96
Number of pages1
Publication statusPublished - 2 Jul 2018
Event34th Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health International Conference on Sustainable Geochemistry - Avani Victoria Falls Resort, Livingstone, Zambia
Duration: 2 Jul 20187 Jul 2018
Conference number: 34
https://segh2018.org/ (Conference website)

Conference

Conference34th Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health International Conference on Sustainable Geochemistry
Abbreviated titleSEGH 2018
CountryZambia
CityLivingstone
Period2/07/187/07/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

estuarine sediment
pollution
antibiotic resistance
antibiotics
public health
microbial community
PAH
human activity
metal
sediment
parameter
contamination
environmental health
industrial pollution
industrial activity

Keywords

  • Antimicrobial resistance
  • Environment
  • Sediment pollution
  • Acanthamoeba
  • sediment
  • Pollution
  • Potentially toxic elements (PTEs)

Cite this

Rodgers, K., McLellan, I., Peshkur, T., Williams, R., Tonner, R., Hursthouse, A. S., ... Henriquez, F. L. (2018). Can legacy pollution influence antimicrobial resistance in estuarine sediments? the geochemical role!. 96-96. 34th Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health International Conference on Sustainable Geochemistry, Livingstone, Zambia.
Rodgers, Kiri ; McLellan, Iain ; Peshkur, Tatyana ; Williams, Roderick ; Tonner, Rebecca ; Hursthouse, Andrew S. ; Knapp, Charles W. ; Henriquez, Fiona L. / Can legacy pollution influence antimicrobial resistance in estuarine sediments? the geochemical role!. 34th Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health International Conference on Sustainable Geochemistry, Livingstone, Zambia.1 p.
@conference{5f139fe6b75f441bb988358b5d5df248,
title = "Can legacy pollution influence antimicrobial resistance in estuarine sediments?: the geochemical role!",
abstract = "Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is fast becoming a top concern worldwide with the potential for catastrophic repercussions. The majority of research to date focuses on the medicalcauses, particularly the use and disposal of antibiotics, however there is growing evidence that in fact “stressful” environments caused by anthropogenic activities with subsequentgeochemical contaminates to be a notable attributor to AMR as well. This research highlights key geochemical parameters e.g. Metal and PAH contamination in sediments from the riverClyde, which is a key historical hub of industrial activity and pollution, and the correlations they have with the abundance of antimicrobial resistance.The ability to compare different pollution conditions among stratified layers in estuarine sediments allow us to determine key contributing factors affecting antibiotic resistance(AMR) in microbial communities. This is a unique approach of investigating resistance traits will generate a wealth of information about how our past industrial actions may impact public and environmental health now and/or the near future. Ultimately not only does such a connection highlight that the AMR widespread problem is greater than we thought, but offersa potential of treatment or a way of controlling its prevalence in a sustainable way.",
keywords = "Antimicrobial resistance, Environment, Sediment pollution, Acanthamoeba, sediment, Pollution, Potentially toxic elements (PTEs)",
author = "Kiri Rodgers and Iain McLellan and Tatyana Peshkur and Roderick Williams and Rebecca Tonner and Hursthouse, {Andrew S.} and Knapp, {Charles W.} and Henriquez, {Fiona L.}",
year = "2018",
month = "7",
day = "2",
language = "English",
pages = "96--96",
note = "34th Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health International Conference on Sustainable Geochemistry, SEGH 2018 ; Conference date: 02-07-2018 Through 07-07-2018",
url = "https://segh2018.org/",

}

Rodgers, K, McLellan, I, Peshkur, T, Williams, R, Tonner, R, Hursthouse, AS, Knapp, CW & Henriquez, FL 2018, 'Can legacy pollution influence antimicrobial resistance in estuarine sediments? the geochemical role!', 34th Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health International Conference on Sustainable Geochemistry, Livingstone, Zambia, 2/07/18 - 7/07/18 pp. 96-96.

Can legacy pollution influence antimicrobial resistance in estuarine sediments? the geochemical role! / Rodgers, Kiri; McLellan, Iain (Contributor); Peshkur, Tatyana (Contributor); Williams, Roderick (Contributor); Tonner, Rebecca (Contributor); Hursthouse, Andrew S. (Contributor); Knapp, Charles W. (Contributor); Henriquez, Fiona L. (Contributor).

2018. 96-96 34th Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health International Conference on Sustainable Geochemistry, Livingstone, Zambia.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePresentation

TY - CONF

T1 - Can legacy pollution influence antimicrobial resistance in estuarine sediments?

T2 - the geochemical role!

AU - Rodgers, Kiri

A2 - McLellan, Iain

A2 - Peshkur, Tatyana

A2 - Williams, Roderick

A2 - Tonner, Rebecca

A2 - Hursthouse, Andrew S.

A2 - Knapp, Charles W.

A2 - Henriquez, Fiona L.

PY - 2018/7/2

Y1 - 2018/7/2

N2 - Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is fast becoming a top concern worldwide with the potential for catastrophic repercussions. The majority of research to date focuses on the medicalcauses, particularly the use and disposal of antibiotics, however there is growing evidence that in fact “stressful” environments caused by anthropogenic activities with subsequentgeochemical contaminates to be a notable attributor to AMR as well. This research highlights key geochemical parameters e.g. Metal and PAH contamination in sediments from the riverClyde, which is a key historical hub of industrial activity and pollution, and the correlations they have with the abundance of antimicrobial resistance.The ability to compare different pollution conditions among stratified layers in estuarine sediments allow us to determine key contributing factors affecting antibiotic resistance(AMR) in microbial communities. This is a unique approach of investigating resistance traits will generate a wealth of information about how our past industrial actions may impact public and environmental health now and/or the near future. Ultimately not only does such a connection highlight that the AMR widespread problem is greater than we thought, but offersa potential of treatment or a way of controlling its prevalence in a sustainable way.

AB - Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is fast becoming a top concern worldwide with the potential for catastrophic repercussions. The majority of research to date focuses on the medicalcauses, particularly the use and disposal of antibiotics, however there is growing evidence that in fact “stressful” environments caused by anthropogenic activities with subsequentgeochemical contaminates to be a notable attributor to AMR as well. This research highlights key geochemical parameters e.g. Metal and PAH contamination in sediments from the riverClyde, which is a key historical hub of industrial activity and pollution, and the correlations they have with the abundance of antimicrobial resistance.The ability to compare different pollution conditions among stratified layers in estuarine sediments allow us to determine key contributing factors affecting antibiotic resistance(AMR) in microbial communities. This is a unique approach of investigating resistance traits will generate a wealth of information about how our past industrial actions may impact public and environmental health now and/or the near future. Ultimately not only does such a connection highlight that the AMR widespread problem is greater than we thought, but offersa potential of treatment or a way of controlling its prevalence in a sustainable way.

KW - Antimicrobial resistance

KW - Environment

KW - Sediment pollution

KW - Acanthamoeba

KW - sediment

KW - Pollution

KW - Potentially toxic elements (PTEs)

UR - https://segh2018.org/

M3 - Presentation

SP - 96

EP - 96

ER -

Rodgers K, McLellan I, Peshkur T, Williams R, Tonner R, Hursthouse AS et al. Can legacy pollution influence antimicrobial resistance in estuarine sediments? the geochemical role!. 2018. 34th Society for Environmental Geochemistry and Health International Conference on Sustainable Geochemistry, Livingstone, Zambia.