Bright 1 bodies

extending the bright bodies family-based intensive lifestyles therapy to adolescents with type 1 diabetes

Garrett Ash, Kevin Joiner, Mary Savoye, Julien Baker, James Gerosa, Emma Kleck, Neha Patel, Matthew Stults-Kolehmainen, Stuart A. Weinzimer, Margaret Grey

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

Abstract

BackgroundOver two-thirds of adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are sedentary. The Bright 1 Bodies Intensive Lifestyles Program aimed to promote their physical activity (PA) by group exercise classes from the Bright Bodies Weight Management Program, combined with T1D self-management education, copingskills discussions, and parent classes. This pilot study aimed to: 1) evaluate intervention feasibility and acceptability; and 2) examine changes in PA, nutrition, BMI, and T1D self-management behaviors.
MethodsBright 1 Bodies offered 12 sessions per week to sedentary adolescents with T1D (n=18; age 13.7 ± 2.3yrs; 67% female; 67% African-American/Latino; A1c 9.5 ± 2.3%; BMI 88 ± 12%’ile). At baseline and 12wk we assessed: a) feasibility by % enrolled of eligible candidates approached and # of sessions attended; b) acceptability by a 28-item exit survey graded on a 5-point Likert scale: c) PA apart from intervention sessions by number and duration of moderate to vigorous bouts (≥10min, ≥3 METs) registered by a hip accelerometer over 7 days’ wear;d) nutrition by # of fruit and vegetable servings (80g) recorded on 3-day food logs; e) glycemic control by HbA1c, mean glucose, glycemic profiles (% readings <70, 70–180, and >180 mg·dL-1), and insulin daily dose; and f) self-managementvariables by # of weekly glucose tests, the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey Worry Subscale (HFS-W), diabetes Self-Care Inventory (SCI), and Quality of Life Diabetes Module (QOL-D). Repeated measures ANCOVA (covariates gender & age, significance p≤0.05) and Becker’s effect size (d≥0.20 small, ≥0.50 moderate, ≥0.80 large) analyzed the data.
ResultsAmong the 105 eligible candidates approached, n=18 enrolled (16%) and attended median 8 of 12 sessions (range 3–12) while 78% of parents (n=14) attended median 6 sessions (range 1–10). Acceptability scores on all subscales were high (program components/strategies X±SD 4.5 ± 0.4, participant comfort 4.3 ± 0.5, instructor-related factors 4.3 ± 0.6). At both baseline and 12wk, PA (2.6 ± 3.4vs4.3 ± 7.1 * 10-min bouts/week, p=0.52, d=0.22) was low, screen time high (3.6 ± 2.8vs4.1 ± 2.9hrs/day, d<0.20), BMI overweight(24.8 ± 3.1vs24.9 ± 3.3kg*m-2, p=0.35, d<0.20), and glycemic control poor (A1c 9.5 ± 2.3vs9.4 ± 2.1%, p=0.72, d<0.20). Self-management behaviors were also unchanged (p>0.05, d<0.20).
ConclusionThe intervention was feasible and acceptable but did not improve poor PA and nutrition among sedentary adolescents with T1D, suggesting this at-risk population needs more intensive interventions.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberB112
Pages (from-to)S281-S281
Number of pages1
JournalAnnals of Behavioral Medicine
Volume52
Issue numberSupplement 1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 11 Apr 2018

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Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus
Life Style
Exercise
Self Care
Therapeutics
Glucose
Hispanic Americans
Hypoglycemia
African Americans
Vegetables
Fear
Hip
Reading
Fruit
Parents
Body Weight
Quality of Life
Insulin
Education
Food

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Ash, G., Joiner, K., Savoye, M., Baker, J., Gerosa, J., Kleck, E., ... Grey, M. (2018). Bright 1 bodies: extending the bright bodies family-based intensive lifestyles therapy to adolescents with type 1 diabetes. Annals of Behavioral Medicine, 52(Supplement 1), S281-S281. [B112]. https://doi.org/10.1093/abm/kay013
Ash, Garrett ; Joiner, Kevin ; Savoye, Mary ; Baker, Julien ; Gerosa, James ; Kleck, Emma ; Patel, Neha ; Stults-Kolehmainen, Matthew ; Weinzimer, Stuart A. ; Grey, Margaret . / Bright 1 bodies : extending the bright bodies family-based intensive lifestyles therapy to adolescents with type 1 diabetes. In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine. 2018 ; Vol. 52, No. Supplement 1. pp. S281-S281.
@article{a1dfeb366e0e40cb8ed8fae6df018998,
title = "Bright 1 bodies: extending the bright bodies family-based intensive lifestyles therapy to adolescents with type 1 diabetes",
abstract = "BackgroundOver two-thirds of adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are sedentary. The Bright 1 Bodies Intensive Lifestyles Program aimed to promote their physical activity (PA) by group exercise classes from the Bright Bodies Weight Management Program, combined with T1D self-management education, copingskills discussions, and parent classes. This pilot study aimed to: 1) evaluate intervention feasibility and acceptability; and 2) examine changes in PA, nutrition, BMI, and T1D self-management behaviors.MethodsBright 1 Bodies offered 12 sessions per week to sedentary adolescents with T1D (n=18; age 13.7 ± 2.3yrs; 67{\%} female; 67{\%} African-American/Latino; A1c 9.5 ± 2.3{\%}; BMI 88 ± 12{\%}’ile). At baseline and 12wk we assessed: a) feasibility by {\%} enrolled of eligible candidates approached and # of sessions attended; b) acceptability by a 28-item exit survey graded on a 5-point Likert scale: c) PA apart from intervention sessions by number and duration of moderate to vigorous bouts (≥10min, ≥3 METs) registered by a hip accelerometer over 7 days’ wear;d) nutrition by # of fruit and vegetable servings (80g) recorded on 3-day food logs; e) glycemic control by HbA1c, mean glucose, glycemic profiles ({\%} readings <70, 70–180, and >180 mg·dL-1), and insulin daily dose; and f) self-managementvariables by # of weekly glucose tests, the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey Worry Subscale (HFS-W), diabetes Self-Care Inventory (SCI), and Quality of Life Diabetes Module (QOL-D). Repeated measures ANCOVA (covariates gender & age, significance p≤0.05) and Becker’s effect size (d≥0.20 small, ≥0.50 moderate, ≥0.80 large) analyzed the data.ResultsAmong the 105 eligible candidates approached, n=18 enrolled (16{\%}) and attended median 8 of 12 sessions (range 3–12) while 78{\%} of parents (n=14) attended median 6 sessions (range 1–10). Acceptability scores on all subscales were high (program components/strategies X±SD 4.5 ± 0.4, participant comfort 4.3 ± 0.5, instructor-related factors 4.3 ± 0.6). At both baseline and 12wk, PA (2.6 ± 3.4vs4.3 ± 7.1 * 10-min bouts/week, p=0.52, d=0.22) was low, screen time high (3.6 ± 2.8vs4.1 ± 2.9hrs/day, d<0.20), BMI overweight(24.8 ± 3.1vs24.9 ± 3.3kg*m-2, p=0.35, d<0.20), and glycemic control poor (A1c 9.5 ± 2.3vs9.4 ± 2.1{\%}, p=0.72, d<0.20). Self-management behaviors were also unchanged (p>0.05, d<0.20).ConclusionThe intervention was feasible and acceptable but did not improve poor PA and nutrition among sedentary adolescents with T1D, suggesting this at-risk population needs more intensive interventions.",
author = "Garrett Ash and Kevin Joiner and Mary Savoye and Julien Baker and James Gerosa and Emma Kleck and Neha Patel and Matthew Stults-Kolehmainen and Weinzimer, {Stuart A.} and Margaret Grey",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "11",
doi = "10.1093/abm/kay013",
language = "English",
volume = "52",
pages = "S281--S281",
journal = "Annals of Behavioral Medicine",
issn = "0883-6612",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",
number = "Supplement 1",

}

Ash, G, Joiner, K, Savoye, M, Baker, J, Gerosa, J, Kleck, E, Patel, N, Stults-Kolehmainen, M, Weinzimer, SA & Grey, M 2018, 'Bright 1 bodies: extending the bright bodies family-based intensive lifestyles therapy to adolescents with type 1 diabetes', Annals of Behavioral Medicine, vol. 52, no. Supplement 1, B112, pp. S281-S281. https://doi.org/10.1093/abm/kay013

Bright 1 bodies : extending the bright bodies family-based intensive lifestyles therapy to adolescents with type 1 diabetes. / Ash, Garrett; Joiner, Kevin; Savoye, Mary ; Baker, Julien; Gerosa, James ; Kleck, Emma ; Patel, Neha; Stults-Kolehmainen, Matthew ; Weinzimer, Stuart A. ; Grey, Margaret .

In: Annals of Behavioral Medicine, Vol. 52, No. Supplement 1, B112, 11.04.2018, p. S281-S281.

Research output: Contribution to journalMeeting Abstract

TY - JOUR

T1 - Bright 1 bodies

T2 - extending the bright bodies family-based intensive lifestyles therapy to adolescents with type 1 diabetes

AU - Ash, Garrett

AU - Joiner, Kevin

AU - Savoye, Mary

AU - Baker, Julien

AU - Gerosa, James

AU - Kleck, Emma

AU - Patel, Neha

AU - Stults-Kolehmainen, Matthew

AU - Weinzimer, Stuart A.

AU - Grey, Margaret

PY - 2018/4/11

Y1 - 2018/4/11

N2 - BackgroundOver two-thirds of adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are sedentary. The Bright 1 Bodies Intensive Lifestyles Program aimed to promote their physical activity (PA) by group exercise classes from the Bright Bodies Weight Management Program, combined with T1D self-management education, copingskills discussions, and parent classes. This pilot study aimed to: 1) evaluate intervention feasibility and acceptability; and 2) examine changes in PA, nutrition, BMI, and T1D self-management behaviors.MethodsBright 1 Bodies offered 12 sessions per week to sedentary adolescents with T1D (n=18; age 13.7 ± 2.3yrs; 67% female; 67% African-American/Latino; A1c 9.5 ± 2.3%; BMI 88 ± 12%’ile). At baseline and 12wk we assessed: a) feasibility by % enrolled of eligible candidates approached and # of sessions attended; b) acceptability by a 28-item exit survey graded on a 5-point Likert scale: c) PA apart from intervention sessions by number and duration of moderate to vigorous bouts (≥10min, ≥3 METs) registered by a hip accelerometer over 7 days’ wear;d) nutrition by # of fruit and vegetable servings (80g) recorded on 3-day food logs; e) glycemic control by HbA1c, mean glucose, glycemic profiles (% readings <70, 70–180, and >180 mg·dL-1), and insulin daily dose; and f) self-managementvariables by # of weekly glucose tests, the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey Worry Subscale (HFS-W), diabetes Self-Care Inventory (SCI), and Quality of Life Diabetes Module (QOL-D). Repeated measures ANCOVA (covariates gender & age, significance p≤0.05) and Becker’s effect size (d≥0.20 small, ≥0.50 moderate, ≥0.80 large) analyzed the data.ResultsAmong the 105 eligible candidates approached, n=18 enrolled (16%) and attended median 8 of 12 sessions (range 3–12) while 78% of parents (n=14) attended median 6 sessions (range 1–10). Acceptability scores on all subscales were high (program components/strategies X±SD 4.5 ± 0.4, participant comfort 4.3 ± 0.5, instructor-related factors 4.3 ± 0.6). At both baseline and 12wk, PA (2.6 ± 3.4vs4.3 ± 7.1 * 10-min bouts/week, p=0.52, d=0.22) was low, screen time high (3.6 ± 2.8vs4.1 ± 2.9hrs/day, d<0.20), BMI overweight(24.8 ± 3.1vs24.9 ± 3.3kg*m-2, p=0.35, d<0.20), and glycemic control poor (A1c 9.5 ± 2.3vs9.4 ± 2.1%, p=0.72, d<0.20). Self-management behaviors were also unchanged (p>0.05, d<0.20).ConclusionThe intervention was feasible and acceptable but did not improve poor PA and nutrition among sedentary adolescents with T1D, suggesting this at-risk population needs more intensive interventions.

AB - BackgroundOver two-thirds of adolescents with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are sedentary. The Bright 1 Bodies Intensive Lifestyles Program aimed to promote their physical activity (PA) by group exercise classes from the Bright Bodies Weight Management Program, combined with T1D self-management education, copingskills discussions, and parent classes. This pilot study aimed to: 1) evaluate intervention feasibility and acceptability; and 2) examine changes in PA, nutrition, BMI, and T1D self-management behaviors.MethodsBright 1 Bodies offered 12 sessions per week to sedentary adolescents with T1D (n=18; age 13.7 ± 2.3yrs; 67% female; 67% African-American/Latino; A1c 9.5 ± 2.3%; BMI 88 ± 12%’ile). At baseline and 12wk we assessed: a) feasibility by % enrolled of eligible candidates approached and # of sessions attended; b) acceptability by a 28-item exit survey graded on a 5-point Likert scale: c) PA apart from intervention sessions by number and duration of moderate to vigorous bouts (≥10min, ≥3 METs) registered by a hip accelerometer over 7 days’ wear;d) nutrition by # of fruit and vegetable servings (80g) recorded on 3-day food logs; e) glycemic control by HbA1c, mean glucose, glycemic profiles (% readings <70, 70–180, and >180 mg·dL-1), and insulin daily dose; and f) self-managementvariables by # of weekly glucose tests, the Hypoglycemia Fear Survey Worry Subscale (HFS-W), diabetes Self-Care Inventory (SCI), and Quality of Life Diabetes Module (QOL-D). Repeated measures ANCOVA (covariates gender & age, significance p≤0.05) and Becker’s effect size (d≥0.20 small, ≥0.50 moderate, ≥0.80 large) analyzed the data.ResultsAmong the 105 eligible candidates approached, n=18 enrolled (16%) and attended median 8 of 12 sessions (range 3–12) while 78% of parents (n=14) attended median 6 sessions (range 1–10). Acceptability scores on all subscales were high (program components/strategies X±SD 4.5 ± 0.4, participant comfort 4.3 ± 0.5, instructor-related factors 4.3 ± 0.6). At both baseline and 12wk, PA (2.6 ± 3.4vs4.3 ± 7.1 * 10-min bouts/week, p=0.52, d=0.22) was low, screen time high (3.6 ± 2.8vs4.1 ± 2.9hrs/day, d<0.20), BMI overweight(24.8 ± 3.1vs24.9 ± 3.3kg*m-2, p=0.35, d<0.20), and glycemic control poor (A1c 9.5 ± 2.3vs9.4 ± 2.1%, p=0.72, d<0.20). Self-management behaviors were also unchanged (p>0.05, d<0.20).ConclusionThe intervention was feasible and acceptable but did not improve poor PA and nutrition among sedentary adolescents with T1D, suggesting this at-risk population needs more intensive interventions.

U2 - 10.1093/abm/kay013

DO - 10.1093/abm/kay013

M3 - Meeting Abstract

VL - 52

SP - S281-S281

JO - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

JF - Annals of Behavioral Medicine

SN - 0883-6612

IS - Supplement 1

M1 - B112

ER -