Blame is in the eye of the beholder: assessing the role of ambivalent sexism on subtle rape myth acceptance

Valentina Gosetti, Kallia Manoussaki

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Abstract

The aim of the present study was to determine whether ambivalent sexism predicts subtle rape myth acceptance. Respondents comprised of 211 university students, who completed the Ambivalent Sexism Inventory (Glick & Fiske, 1996) and the updated version of the Illinois Rape Myth Acceptance scale (McMahon & Farmer, 2011). Results indicated that while benevolent sexism significantly predicted acceptance of subtle rape myths, hostile sexism did not. Additionally, male participants reported more ambivalent sexism and subtle rape myth acceptance than females. These findings add to the literature investigating gender inequality and rape mythology by giving a first account on the link between subtle rape myths and ambivalent sexist attitudes.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)284-295
Number of pages12
JournalAdvances in Social Sciences Research Journal
Volume 8
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 23 Feb 2021

Keywords

  • gender-based violence
  • rape mythology
  • subtle rape myths
  • ambivalent sexism

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