Barriers to implementing an integrated care pathway for the last days of life in nursing homes

Julie Watson, Jo Hockley, Belinda Dewar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

AIM: this paper explores the barriers that needed to be overcome during the process of implementing an integrated care pathway for the last days of life as a way of developing quality end-of-life care in nursing homes.

METHODS: an action research methodology underpinned the study. Qualitative and quantitative data were collected in eight nursing homes before, during and after the implementation of the care pathway.

FINDINGS: six main barriers were identified: a lack of knowledge of palliative care drugs and control of symptoms at the end of life; lack of preparation for approaching death; not knowing when someone is dying or understanding the dying process; lack of multidisciplinary team working in nursing homes; lack of confidence in communicating about dying; some nursing homes are not ready or able to change. These findings highlight a functional 'rehabilitative' culture that may not be so appropriate in the current context of nursing home care, and one that makes implementing an integrated care pathway for the last days of life less straightforward than in other settings.

CONCLUSION: it cannot be presumed that the implementation of a care pathway for the last days of life in nursing homes is straightforward. This study suggests that an action research framework was extremely useful in highlighting and overcoming some obstacles when developing evidence-based practice. Action at both local and public policy level is required to fully address barriers that prevent quality end-of-life care in nursing homes.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)234-40
Number of pages7
JournalInternational Journal of Palliative Nursing
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - May 2006
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Nursing Homes
Terminal Care
Health Services Research
Quality of Life
Evidence-Based Practice
Drug and Narcotic Control
Public Policy
Home Care Services
Nursing Care
Palliative Care
Research Design

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Attitude of Health Personnel
  • Attitude to Death
  • Attitude to Health
  • Clinical Competence
  • Critical Pathways
  • Family
  • Geriatric Nursing
  • Health Services Research
  • Humans
  • Needs Assessment
  • Nursing Evaluation Research
  • Nursing Homes
  • Nursing Methodology Research
  • Nursing Staff
  • Organizational Culture
  • Philosophy, Nursing
  • Program Development
  • Program Evaluation
  • Qualitative Research
  • Quality of Life
  • Self Efficacy
  • Terminal Care
  • Evaluation Studies
  • Journal Article

Cite this

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Barriers to implementing an integrated care pathway for the last days of life in nursing homes. / Watson, Julie; Hockley, Jo; Dewar, Belinda.

In: International Journal of Palliative Nursing, Vol. 12, No. 5, 05.2006, p. 234-40.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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