Asymmetric interference in the mono-, bi- and multi-lingual brain: evidence from concurrent verbal-motor task performance

Joanne Ingram*, Sameera Sidat, Anastasia Giannakopoulou, Christopher J Hand

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The functional distance hypothesis (FDH) predicts that tasks regulated by cerebral networks in closer anatomical proximity will cause more interference than tasks regulated by distant regions. Support for the FDH has been found in studies of left/right brain asymmetries in the interactions of concurrent communication and manual tasks. A mixed design was used to investigate the effects of dual-task interference. Fifty right-handed monolinguals, bilinguals and multilinguals underwent a test of phonemic verbal fluency (VF) with right- and left-handed motor activity, in isolation and concurrently. Monolingual participants were impaired when completing the VF task concurrently with right-hand motor activity; whilst bilingual and multilingual participants were impaired when completing the task concurrently with left-hand motor activity. Monolingual participants showed superior performance when performing the
motor task concurrently with the VF task when using their left- as opposed to right-hand; whilst multilingual participants showed superior performance when using their right- as opposed to left-hand. The overall pattern of findings indicated the presence of some hemisphere-specific interference between groups. Findings and implications are discussed in line with the FDH and
other neurophysiological evidence.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 18 Apr 2018
EventExperimental Psychology Society Leicester Meeting - University of Leicester, Leicester, United Kingdom
Duration: 18 Apr 201820 Apr 2018
https://eps.ac.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/02/Leicester-Programme.pdf

Meeting

MeetingExperimental Psychology Society Leicester Meeting
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityLeicester
Period18/04/1820/04/18
Internet address

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Asymmetric interference in the mono-, bi- and multi-lingual brain: evidence from concurrent verbal-motor task performance'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this