Applying the ADDIE model to eAssessment in Applied Skills for Nursing

Jacqueline White, Lesley Hamilton

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

Abstract

Clinical nursing skills are essential to deliver safe and effective patient care. At UWS, the undergraduate adult nursing programme assesses clinical skills in practice and throughout clinical skills modules formatively as well as summatively, through the use of an Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE’s). However, OSCE’s are typically associated with high levels of assessors and increased levels of stress that can impact on performance of clinical capability and learning (Muldoon et al 2014). As part of curriculum development the Applied Skills module assessment was developed into an online one that tests students’ knowledge and understanding, with formative assessment taking place throughout the twelve weeks of the module and within practice placements.

This online assessment was developed by the module team in consultation with Education Futures and is now in its second year of implementation with 952 students across four campuses having been assessed. The redesign of the assessment has resulted in number of benefits with a high pass rate demonstrating underpinning knowledge of the module content, reduction in time and staff resources when compared with the previous OSCE type assessment. Online formative assessments with immediate feedback were designed for students to practice in advance of the summative assessment.

This presentation will discuss the merits of online testing of practical knowledge including the benefits and challenges of adopting this approach. Questions were designed to objectively test students’ knowledge and decision making skills with clear alignment to the practical experience. The impact of utilising this approach will be discussed in this presentation.

Muldoon, K., Biesty, L., Smith, V. (2014) “I found the OSCE stressful”, student midwifes’ attitudes towards an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), Nurse Education Today, 34, (3), 468-473.
Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - 27 Jun 2018
EventUWS Learning, Teaching & Research Conference 2018: Bridging Boundaries: Connecting Learning, Teaching & Research - UWS Paisley Campus, Paisley, United Kingdom
Duration: 27 Jun 201828 Jun 2018
https://ltr.uws.ac.uk/
https://ltr.uws.ac.uk/

Conference

ConferenceUWS Learning, Teaching & Research Conference 2018
Abbreviated titleUWSLTR
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityPaisley
Period27/06/1828/06/18
Internet address

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nursing
examination
student
curriculum development
patient care
education
nurse
staff
decision making
resources
learning
performance
experience

Cite this

White, J., & Hamilton, L. (2018). Applying the ADDIE model to eAssessment in Applied Skills for Nursing. Poster session presented at UWS Learning, Teaching & Research Conference 2018, Paisley, United Kingdom.
White, Jacqueline ; Hamilton, Lesley. / Applying the ADDIE model to eAssessment in Applied Skills for Nursing. Poster session presented at UWS Learning, Teaching & Research Conference 2018, Paisley, United Kingdom.
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White, J & Hamilton, L 2018, 'Applying the ADDIE model to eAssessment in Applied Skills for Nursing' UWS Learning, Teaching & Research Conference 2018, Paisley, United Kingdom, 27/06/18 - 28/06/18, .

Applying the ADDIE model to eAssessment in Applied Skills for Nursing. / White, Jacqueline; Hamilton, Lesley.

2018. Poster session presented at UWS Learning, Teaching & Research Conference 2018, Paisley, United Kingdom.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePoster

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T1 - Applying the ADDIE model to eAssessment in Applied Skills for Nursing

AU - White, Jacqueline

AU - Hamilton, Lesley

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Y1 - 2018/6/27

N2 - Clinical nursing skills are essential to deliver safe and effective patient care. At UWS, the undergraduate adult nursing programme assesses clinical skills in practice and throughout clinical skills modules formatively as well as summatively, through the use of an Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE’s). However, OSCE’s are typically associated with high levels of assessors and increased levels of stress that can impact on performance of clinical capability and learning (Muldoon et al 2014). As part of curriculum development the Applied Skills module assessment was developed into an online one that tests students’ knowledge and understanding, with formative assessment taking place throughout the twelve weeks of the module and within practice placements. This online assessment was developed by the module team in consultation with Education Futures and is now in its second year of implementation with 952 students across four campuses having been assessed. The redesign of the assessment has resulted in number of benefits with a high pass rate demonstrating underpinning knowledge of the module content, reduction in time and staff resources when compared with the previous OSCE type assessment. Online formative assessments with immediate feedback were designed for students to practice in advance of the summative assessment.This presentation will discuss the merits of online testing of practical knowledge including the benefits and challenges of adopting this approach. Questions were designed to objectively test students’ knowledge and decision making skills with clear alignment to the practical experience. The impact of utilising this approach will be discussed in this presentation.Muldoon, K., Biesty, L., Smith, V. (2014) “I found the OSCE stressful”, student midwifes’ attitudes towards an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), Nurse Education Today, 34, (3), 468-473.

AB - Clinical nursing skills are essential to deliver safe and effective patient care. At UWS, the undergraduate adult nursing programme assesses clinical skills in practice and throughout clinical skills modules formatively as well as summatively, through the use of an Objective Structured Clinical Examinations (OSCE’s). However, OSCE’s are typically associated with high levels of assessors and increased levels of stress that can impact on performance of clinical capability and learning (Muldoon et al 2014). As part of curriculum development the Applied Skills module assessment was developed into an online one that tests students’ knowledge and understanding, with formative assessment taking place throughout the twelve weeks of the module and within practice placements. This online assessment was developed by the module team in consultation with Education Futures and is now in its second year of implementation with 952 students across four campuses having been assessed. The redesign of the assessment has resulted in number of benefits with a high pass rate demonstrating underpinning knowledge of the module content, reduction in time and staff resources when compared with the previous OSCE type assessment. Online formative assessments with immediate feedback were designed for students to practice in advance of the summative assessment.This presentation will discuss the merits of online testing of practical knowledge including the benefits and challenges of adopting this approach. Questions were designed to objectively test students’ knowledge and decision making skills with clear alignment to the practical experience. The impact of utilising this approach will be discussed in this presentation.Muldoon, K., Biesty, L., Smith, V. (2014) “I found the OSCE stressful”, student midwifes’ attitudes towards an Objective Structured Clinical Examination (OSCE), Nurse Education Today, 34, (3), 468-473.

M3 - Poster

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White J, Hamilton L. Applying the ADDIE model to eAssessment in Applied Skills for Nursing. 2018. Poster session presented at UWS Learning, Teaching & Research Conference 2018, Paisley, United Kingdom.