Anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse: not only an elite performance issue?

Julien S. Baker, Non E. Thomas, Bruce Davies, Michael R. Graham

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Introduction
The use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) for reasons other than medical treatment, was considered to be restricted to the bodybuilders or professional athletes. A study in 2001, by our research unit, demonstrated a high prevalence of AAS use by recreational gym users. From 106 questionnaires, 53% (56/106) had used AAS within the past year but no females reported using AAS.

Methods
The present study was conducted amongst a similar sample of recreational gym users in the South Wales area.

Results
From 146 questionnaires, 70% (102/146 individuals) reported AAS use and 7% (10/146 individuals) of respondents were female. Mean age of sample was 33.6 ± 6.7 years and ranged from 15-72 years of age. This research demonstrated an enormous increase in the drug, growth hormone (24%), which had been used to reduce body fat.

The demographic and social characteristics of the respondents indicated that AAS users were from differing socioeconomic backgrounds (wealthy and non-wealthy) and did not fall into any specific category (working class, middle class or upper class).

Conclusion
In the recreational fitness industry their use would appear to be predominantly for vanity and cosmetic reasons.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)38-39
Number of pages2
JournalThe Open Sports Medicine Journal
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2015
Externally publishedYes

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Testosterone Congeners
Wales
Research
Cosmetics
Athletes
Growth Hormone
Adipose Tissue
Industry
Demography
Surveys and Questionnaires
Pharmaceutical Preparations

Cite this

Baker, Julien S. ; Thomas, Non E. ; Davies, Bruce ; Graham, Michael R. / Anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse : not only an elite performance issue?. In: The Open Sports Medicine Journal. 2015 ; Vol. 9. pp. 38-39.
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title = "Anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse: not only an elite performance issue?",
abstract = "IntroductionThe use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) for reasons other than medical treatment, was considered to be restricted to the bodybuilders or professional athletes. A study in 2001, by our research unit, demonstrated a high prevalence of AAS use by recreational gym users. From 106 questionnaires, 53{\%} (56/106) had used AAS within the past year but no females reported using AAS.MethodsThe present study was conducted amongst a similar sample of recreational gym users in the South Wales area.ResultsFrom 146 questionnaires, 70{\%} (102/146 individuals) reported AAS use and 7{\%} (10/146 individuals) of respondents were female. Mean age of sample was 33.6 ± 6.7 years and ranged from 15-72 years of age. This research demonstrated an enormous increase in the drug, growth hormone (24{\%}), which had been used to reduce body fat.The demographic and social characteristics of the respondents indicated that AAS users were from differing socioeconomic backgrounds (wealthy and non-wealthy) and did not fall into any specific category (working class, middle class or upper class).ConclusionIn the recreational fitness industry their use would appear to be predominantly for vanity and cosmetic reasons.",
author = "Baker, {Julien S.} and Thomas, {Non E.} and Bruce Davies and Graham, {Michael R.}",
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language = "English",
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Anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse : not only an elite performance issue? / Baker, Julien S.; Thomas, Non E.; Davies, Bruce; Graham, Michael R.

In: The Open Sports Medicine Journal, Vol. 9, 2015, p. 38-39.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

TY - JOUR

T1 - Anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) abuse

T2 - not only an elite performance issue?

AU - Baker, Julien S.

AU - Thomas, Non E.

AU - Davies, Bruce

AU - Graham, Michael R.

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - IntroductionThe use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) for reasons other than medical treatment, was considered to be restricted to the bodybuilders or professional athletes. A study in 2001, by our research unit, demonstrated a high prevalence of AAS use by recreational gym users. From 106 questionnaires, 53% (56/106) had used AAS within the past year but no females reported using AAS.MethodsThe present study was conducted amongst a similar sample of recreational gym users in the South Wales area.ResultsFrom 146 questionnaires, 70% (102/146 individuals) reported AAS use and 7% (10/146 individuals) of respondents were female. Mean age of sample was 33.6 ± 6.7 years and ranged from 15-72 years of age. This research demonstrated an enormous increase in the drug, growth hormone (24%), which had been used to reduce body fat.The demographic and social characteristics of the respondents indicated that AAS users were from differing socioeconomic backgrounds (wealthy and non-wealthy) and did not fall into any specific category (working class, middle class or upper class).ConclusionIn the recreational fitness industry their use would appear to be predominantly for vanity and cosmetic reasons.

AB - IntroductionThe use of anabolic-androgenic steroids (AAS) for reasons other than medical treatment, was considered to be restricted to the bodybuilders or professional athletes. A study in 2001, by our research unit, demonstrated a high prevalence of AAS use by recreational gym users. From 106 questionnaires, 53% (56/106) had used AAS within the past year but no females reported using AAS.MethodsThe present study was conducted amongst a similar sample of recreational gym users in the South Wales area.ResultsFrom 146 questionnaires, 70% (102/146 individuals) reported AAS use and 7% (10/146 individuals) of respondents were female. Mean age of sample was 33.6 ± 6.7 years and ranged from 15-72 years of age. This research demonstrated an enormous increase in the drug, growth hormone (24%), which had been used to reduce body fat.The demographic and social characteristics of the respondents indicated that AAS users were from differing socioeconomic backgrounds (wealthy and non-wealthy) and did not fall into any specific category (working class, middle class or upper class).ConclusionIn the recreational fitness industry their use would appear to be predominantly for vanity and cosmetic reasons.

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DO - 10.2174/1874387000802010038

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SN - 1874-3870

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