Adults do not appropriately consider mass cues of object brightness and pitch sound to judge outcomes of collision events

Nilihan E. M. Sanal-Hayes, Lawrence D. Hayes, Peter Walker, Jacqueline L. Mair*, J. Gavin Bremner

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
1 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Adults judge darker objects to be heavier in weight than brighter objects, and objects which make lower pitch sounds as heavier in weight than objects making higher pitch sounds. It is unknown whether adults would make similar pairings if they saw these object properties in collision events. Two experiments examined adults’ judgements of computer-generated collision events based on object brightness and collision pitch sound. These experiments were designed as a precursor for an infant study, to validate the phenomenon. Results from the first experiment revealed that adults rated the bright ball likely event (where the bright ball displaced a stationary object a short distance after colliding with it) higher than the bright ball unlikely event. Conversely, adults rated the dark ball unlikely event (where the dark ball displaced a stationary object a short distance after colliding with it) higher than the dark ball likely event. Results from the second experiment demonstrated that adults judged the low pitch unlikely event (where the ball displaced a stationary object a short distance with a low pitch sound) higher than the low pitch likely event. Moreover, adults judged the high pitch likely event (where the ball displaced a stationary object a short distance with a high pitch sound) higher than the high pitch unlikely event. Results of these experiments suggest adults do not appropriately consider object brightness and pitch sound in collision events.
Original languageEnglish
Article number8463
Number of pages10
JournalApplied Sciences
Volume12
Issue number17
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 24 Aug 2022

Keywords

  • perception
  • physical events
  • cognition
  • object brightness
  • pitch
  • coss-sensory
  • visual judgement

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