A semi-open supervision systems model for evaluating staff supervision in adult care organisational settings: the research findings

Sharon Lambley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

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Abstract

This paper offers an original examination of the interrelationship between organizational arrangements, supervisory practices, and outcomes from supervision in a study funded by the Social Care Institute for Excellence. The study aimed to capture examples of good supervision. Researcher’s used systems theory to develop a supervision model, which informed the research design and evaluation (Lambley, 2018). Good supervision was identified by 136 on-line survey participants, and all emerging themes were examined in 19 interviews, within four case study settings. Social workers within an ‘integrated’ case study setting and health workers in a ‘partnership’ setting, said that ‘good’ supervision was supported by organisational policies, supervisor training, and devolved management and professional practice. In the care home and social enterprise settings, supervision was similarly supported, but its delivery was a management performance target. In all four case study settings, good supervision could be negatively transformed by a supervisor’s action (e.g., rigid responses to performance issues) or supervisor’s inaction (e.g., cancelled supervision sessions). Service user feedback on supervision is an underdeveloped area that needs further research. This paper concludes by considering the implications of the research findings for the study of supervision.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberbcy069
Pages (from-to)391-410
Number of pages20
JournalBritish Journal of Social Work
Volume49
Issue number2
Early online date9 Aug 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 31 Mar 2019

Keywords

  • clinical supervision
  • professional supervision
  • management supervision
  • adult care
  • service users

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