A pilot study of personal exposure to respirable and inhalable dust during the sanding and sawing of medium density fibreboard (MDF) and soft wood

Andrew Hursthouse, Fraser Allan, Louise Rowley, Frank Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A pilot study of production of respirable and inhalable dusts from sawing and sanding medium density fibreboard (MDF) and softwood in a typical cabinet-making workshop produced high but variable exposure levels at the bench and operator position. Exposure levels for the total inhalable fraction (similar to <100 &mu;m) were 6.9-91 mg m(-3) for MDF and 2.5-45 mg m(-3) for softwood. For the respirable fraction (<10 mum) levels were 0.4-13 mg m(-3) for MDF and 0.4-2.9 mg m(-3) for softwood. These results show significant dust loading is produced in the coarser fraction and that the material used has a significant impact on levels produced. It suggests that fuller evaluation of operator influence of fine dust production is needed and may question the common application of a single inhalable exposure standard for wood dust to all wood working scenarios.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)323-326
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Journal of Environmental Health Research
Volume14
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Aug 2004

Keywords

  • sampling
  • particles
  • occupational exposure

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