A comparison of the quality of life of vulnerable young males with severe emotional and behaviour difficulties in a residential setting and young males in mainstream schooling

Denise Carroll, Timothy Duffy, Colin Martin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

One hundred and seventy-four males completed a quality of life (QoL) assessment utilizing, a generic paediatric quality of life inventory (PedsQL) and the short form (36) health survey (SF36). The adolescents aged 13-16 years were in a Scottish Centre for young males with social, emotional, behavioural and educational problems. To identify similarities and differences, a comparison group (n = 110) of males in the third and fourth year in a mainstream secondary school were also administered the PedsQL and the SF36 self-rating scales. The effectiveness of the PedsQL and the SF36 for assessing QoL for adolescent males was investigated. There were significant differences between the groups in the Centre and between the Centre groups and the comparison group in terms of their QoL. The results between the groups were found in the PedsQL subscales 'physical functioning' where secure > comparison (P = 0.04); secure > residential (P = 0.008); and PedsQL subscale 'social functioning' day > comparison (P = 0.026); secure > comparison (P = 0.037). SF36 subscales 'role physical functioning' secure > residential (P < 0.001); day > residential (P < 0.001). SF36 'role mental functioning' day > residential (P = 0.001). This study provides a unique insight into the complex dimensions influencing the QoL of this specific group of young people.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)23-30
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Psychiatric and Mental Health Nursing
Volume21
Issue number1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Mar 2013

Keywords

  • child and adolescent
  • institutional dynamics

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